Mullein magical properties

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MULLEIN – sometimes ground and used in place of graveyard dirt. Often used in dark magic spells and to raise spirits. On the flip side of the coin, mullein is hung over doorways as a powerful barrier against demons and evil spirits. Protection against nightmares.

The dried herb mullein possesses a number of magical abilities, including exorcism, divination, health, love, and courage. Carry mullein in a pouch to inspire courage, protection, and love from the other sex. To prevent nightmares, stuff a tiny cushion with mullein and place it beneath your own or a child’s pillow.

Mullein is related to the element of fire and is ruled by Mercury (according to Agrippa) or Saturn (according to Culpepper). It has a feminine essence and is linked to Jupiter, the god. Depending on who you ask, it might or might not be one of the herbs mentioned in the nine herbs charm.

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Description

MULLEIN – sometimes ground and used in place of graveyard dirt. Often used in dark magic spells and to raise spirits. On the flip side of the coin, mullein is hung over doorways as a powerful barrier against demons and evil spirits. Protection against nightmares.

The dried herb mullein possesses a number of magical abilities, including exorcism, divination, health, love, and courage. Carry mullein in a pouch to inspire courage, protection, and love from the other sex. To prevent nightmares, stuff a tiny cushion with mullein and place it beneath your own or a child’s pillow.

Mullein is related to the element of fire and is ruled by Mercury (according to Agrippa) or Saturn (according to Culpepper). It has a feminine essence and is linked to Jupiter, the god. Depending on who you ask, it might or might not be one of the herbs mentioned in the nine herbs charm.

Consider utilizing Mullein stalks for the wicks when crafting your own candles for ceremony. Alternately, the entire stalk could be burned like a candle. Mullein is regarded as a sure defense against sorcery and evil spirits in Indian folklore.

A biennial plant with thick, woolly, grey-green leaves that grow in enormous (up to a foot long) rosettes the first year. The second year, a spike of five-petaled yellow flowers with a tall, leafy flower stalk emerges in late July or early August. The leaves are woolly, alternating, and much wider than they are long. They can be 1 to 5 inches wide and 4 to 12 inches long. Near the top of the plant, they get smaller and get bigger again. Fall is when seeds first appear, and they are pitted, rough, and grooved. They can slumber for several years before sprouting.