Category: witchcraft and Wicca

Witchcraft in Nashville

(reprinted from a 2013 entry)
Some people call what I do witchcraft. It is something different. Hoodoo and folk magic are not witchcraft or Wicca. First of all, Wicca is a religion. In my practical folk magic practice I use a combination of: the gift of intuition, my extensive knowledge of herbs and oils (and how they are used magically), along with a strong sense of intention. My studio and store are located in Nashville, Tennessee, and I often see clients who are looking for ways to reduce stress and find a sense of inner peace. Other clients have other things in mind when they seek me out: to reunite them with a lost love, to find love (in general), to get a promotion or bring more money into their household, etc.

So, is witchcraft a bad thing? That depends on who you ask and if they are truly knowledgeable about what folk magic or witchcraft actually is. I think of it this way – a spell is an intensified prayer that uses a lot of props and ceremony as well as intention. So, if spell work and witchcraft is just about focusing your intention, then wouldn’t something as simple as a vision board be a spell?  Maybe, but not exactly. Depending on the result you are looking to achieve, going to someone who has studied and practiced the elements of magic can be much more effective. It is similar to seeking out a trained doctor’s advice versus going to Google with your symptoms and guessing which over-the-counter medication to buy. Also, those who perform witchcraft or identify themselves as Wiccans are usually bound by the pesky three-fold-law, a philosophy that says what you put out will come back to you times three. Hoodoo practitioners do not believe this.

I have a friend who often asks, “It is white magic, right?” Magic is neither white nor black, good nor bad. The intention of people is what is good or bad. And I repeat, the INTENTION of people – not people – can be good or bad. We all have light and dark elements about us, good thoughts and bad thoughts, good deeds and acts of misbehaving. No one is all good or all bad. Throughout the ages, many people who have been called witches were actually herbal healers. Then why is my website called White Mojo? Easy, White is a family name. It has nothing to do with “white witches” or anything like that.

The oils and powders I create are meant to bring about positive change in people’s lives – ways to help them achieve their goals or to remove negative elements or negative people from their everyday existence. When I set lights for clients (also known as a candle altar service), more people have positive requests than negative ones such as healing, love, money. What I do is more known as conjure than witchcraft.

Our Nashville store offers a full line of witchcraft supplies, books, and tools as well as classes.

223 Donelson Pike
Nashville, TN 37214
PHONE: 615-360-8089

Celebrating Yule

 

Today Yule is used to a lesser extent in the English-speaking world as a primary synonym for Christmas. Present-day Christmas customs and also practices such as the Yule log, Yule goat, Yule boar, Yule singing, and others come from pagan Yule. Today the event is commemorated in Heathenry as well as a few other types of Modern Paganism.

The Pagan holiday known as Yule takes place on the day of the winter solstice, around December 21 when the planet’s axis turns away from the sun in the Northern Hemisphere.

Many cultures all over the world have winter events that are, in reality, parties of light. Along with Christmas, there’s Hanukkah with its brightly lit menorahs, Kwanzaa candles, and so on. As a festival of the Sunlight, one of the most vital parts of any Yule event is light with candles and bonfires.

In the Northern hemisphere, the wintertime solstice has been commemorated for centuries. The Norse peoples that called it Jul saw it as a time for much feasting and merriment. Icelandic legends consider it a time of sacrifice. Other, traditional customs such as the Yule log, the decorated tree, and wassailing have Norse origins.

In the British Isles, the Celts also celebrated midwinter. Although little is understood today about the specifics of what they did, many customs continue. According to the writings of Pliny the Senior, this is the time of year in which Druid clergymen sacrificed a white bull and gathered mistletoe for their yearly celebration

Winter festivals were also typical in Greece and Rome, along with the British Isles. When a new religious movement called Christianity turned up, the new pecking order had problem transforming the Pagans, who didn’t want to give up their holidays. Many Christian traditions were built on old Pagan rituals and worship, causing many Pagan symbols to be integrated right into the meaning of Christianity. Within a couple of centuries, the Christians had every person venerating a new holiday celebrated on December 25th.

In some traditions of Wicca as well as Paganism, the Yule event begins with a Celtic legend where the Oak King and the Holly King go to battle. The Oak King, (the light of the new year), fights each year to take over the Holly King, (the symbol of darkness.) Re-enactment of the battle is performed in some Wiccan rituals.

So, this year will you agree to battle the old Holly King? What elements of light do you plan to shine on your life and goals? After all, it is a time of celebration and renewal. As the sun comes around again, it is the perfect season to welcome new beginnings, new attitudes, and embrace loving energies that will help you build a brighter future.

May your light overcome all your darkness. Happy Yule!

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