Chamomile Face Soap recipe

CHAMOMILE FACE SOAP

The high olive oil content creates a wonderful face bar.
Palmarosa is a grass from Central America with a scent that reminds you
of a lemony version of rose geranium. It is reported to help with
wrinkles as well as being a cellular stimulant. The chamomile tea is a less
expensive way of imparting its skin healing properties. If your budget
allows for some chamomile essential oil (it’s rather expensive), feel free
to add 15 or 20 drops to this batch of soap.

28 oz. olive oil
10 oz. vegetable shortening
6 oz. coconut oil
13.2 oz. water
5.9 oz. lye
3 oz. palmarosa essential oil
½ oz. patchouli essential oil
Contents of one chamomile tea bag

follow standard soap making instructions, see the tab at the top of the website called HOW TO MAKE SOAP.

MORE ABOUT CHAMOMILE
Dried chamomile flower is an age-old medicinal drug known in ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. Chamomile’s popularity grew throughout the Middle Ages, when people turned to it as a remedy for numerous medical complaints including asthma, colic, fevers, inflammations, nausea, nervous complaints, children’s ailments, skin diseases and cancer. As a popular remedy, it may be thought of as the European counterpart of ginseng.

Recent and on-going research has identified chamomile’s specific anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-allergenic and sedative properties, validating its long-held reputation. This attention appears to have increased the popularity of the herb and nowadays Chamomile is included as a drug in the pharmacopoeia of 26 countries.

Chamomile has been used for centuries in teas as a mild, relaxing sleep aid, treatment for fevers, colds, stomach ailments, and as an anti-inflammatory, to name only a few therapeutic uses. Extensive scientific research over the past 20 years has confirmed many of the traditional uses for the plant and established pharmacological mechanisms for the plant’s therapeutic activity, including antipeptic, antispasmodic, antipyretic, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiallergenic activity.

In hair care, chamomile has often been used as a hair rinse for blonde hair. Some soaps that were designed for the hair include chamomile as well as bottled liquid soaps (shampoo). The main purpose for including chamomile in your soap recipe is its reputation for being soothing to the skin.